Review – Goodfella’s Vegan Stonebaked Falafel Pizza

 

The rise in vegan products on supermarket shelves has meant a race to get new and interesting products out there recently.

Pizza seems to be the latest battleground for those fighting for the vegan pounds.

I grabbed (literally) this the falafel pizza out of the Sainsbury’s freezer faster than you can say “hummus aisle”. The price of £2.50 for a normal-sized pizza helped too!

Facebook comments when I posted a picture seem to centre around “why does everything revolve around falafel?” I can sympathise with that view – I’m actually not a huge falafel fan – they can be a bit dry!

On close inspection of the ingredients list, it seems there’s also a “hummus drizzle” – falafel and hummus make the perfect go-to vegan marriage – and that coupling alone will take many to vegan heaven – what a threesome: pizza, falafel and hummus!

To be honest, I didn’t really notice the hummus drizzle – I think it’s more of a trickle than a drizzle. But, on the whole, the pizza is nice.

Pizza whole

There’s lots of topping – it’s especially heavy on the falafel (it is a falafel pizza after all) and the red pepper. There seemed to be a fair bit of spinach too – so you can tell your friends that it’s a slightly healthy meal! It looks very colourful too.

The base is nice and crispy – and certainly not too thick. The falafel is the dominant flavour, but there’s a mild to medium spicy kick. It’s not overly overpowering, but it raises the taste stakes above the bland.

And it needs that kick – the falafel alone isn’t enough to captivate my taste-buds’ interest, but the not-too-powerful kick gives it an extra layer of much-needed flavour. It isn’t too fiery, and I think most people will be able to handle it – I’m certainly not a “the hotter the better type person in the heat stakes.

It isn’t a messy pizza eating wise. This is probably due to the fact there’s no vegan cheese. It relies on the falafel as its main selling point – and I think this works – to an extent. But there’s nothing to stop vegans adding their own toppings to liven things up! For me, a pizza is naked without mushrooms – at least one Facebook friend added vegan cheese to hers and many will miss tomato slices. Garlic and chilli peppers could be an addition for those who do like to taste more spice.

All in all, it’s nice, but it didn’t fill me up. I do eat a lot – if I’m honest – so a side of onion rings or chips makes it the perfect Saturday evening meal.

Finally, I must also add that there are a lot of independent vegan firms now producing pizzas – they may be slightly more expensive, but we all want to support our local health food shops, don’t we?

Pizza ingredients

Farmfoods Veggie Kitchen products reviewed

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It seems that a there isn’t a week going by without a new vegan product launch these days.

One the one hand, it’s great news there are so many products from which to choose, but, it does mean that with so many supermarkets fighting for the vegan pound, our independent health food shops have difficulty in competing. As someone who always bats for the small guy, I find myself torn between trying the new ranges and supporting small businesses.

Farmfoods isn’t generally seen as a big player as far as supermarkets go – but it is good for those on a budget – when I bought products from their Veggie Kitchen range, I got three for a fiver!

I decided to try all of the vegan-friendly products in the Veggie Kitchen range because it really didn’t cost me very much to do so.

Sausages. The sausages are of a similar size and texture to Linda McCartney’s famous veggie sausages – the benchmark by which vegan-friendly sausages are usually measured if we’re honest.

The Farmfoods effort has a similar rusky taste, but they have a herby hint that’s very pleasant indeed. I prefer them to the Linda McCartney ones – and they are certainly value for money – you get eight in a box!

Meatballs. These seem to lack the seasoning hit that their sausage sisters provide. You get a hefty pack and a meaty texture, but they are just a little bit bland. However, this does mean they soak up other flavours well and are great in a passata with pasta or in a nice onion gravy as part of a roast dinner.

We have to remember this is cheap processed food, so sometimes you need to spice things up a little with sauces or seasoning.

Mince. You get a substantial pack of soya mince to use in your spaghetti Bolognaise or shepherd’s pie. Again, the mince alone is a little bland, but then, who eats mince on its own?

It works perfectly in a good spag bog, and that’s all you need really. It doesn’t have a dominant flavour, and, I guess, that’s the point really. You get a lot for your money, meaning it can be stretched across several tasty meals.

Burgers. The Veggie Kitchen burgers have a meaty look and texture. By meaty, I mean substantial – they don’t look or taste like a dead animal – I feel the need to make that clear in our Veganverse. These also lack seasoning, but bung them in a bun with some salad and relish and you have a great burger. They also go brilliantly with gravy.

I have to point out, that while not exploding with taste, none of the products are offensive to the tastebuds – none of them are horrible and none of them are overly disappointing.

Southern Fried Chicken Poppers. These are my favourites in the range. The coating gives them a slight crunch and provides a mild peppery taste – one that’s very agreeable too!

The texture is gorgeous. They almost melt in the mouth – while, again, not having a powerful flavour. But they are perfect with ketchup, which, importantly, means they are very kid-friendly and they get the thumbs-up from me.

All-in-all, if you’re after cheap, quick, processed food, or freezer staples, you could do worse than popping down to Farmfoods.

https://www.farmfoods.co.uk/