The Game Changers – vegan movie review

The Game Changers film poster

The Game Changers is the latest in a list of “must-see” vegan films, but it is the first to receive such widespread cinema showings.

The Peterborough (UK) screening sold out and a number of my friends missed out – it is, however available to pre-order on i-Tunes at the time of writing, and I’m sure it will be available elsewhere in the near future – keep an eye on the website https://gamechangersmovie.com/

But is it any good?

In a word, “yes”. Unlike Earthlings and Land of Hope and Glory, it focuses on the impact of a vegan diet on a human body, while briefly touching on climate change – animal abuse is hardly mentioned and there are no disturbing images – although the discussion on the positive effects of a vegan diet on errections did make a few people blush – but it’s interesting viewing for penis owners and people who enjoy penises in a sexual way.

When it comes to star names, The Game Changers has them in abundance – Arnold Schwarzenegger, Lewis Hamilton and James Cameron – who executive produced the film too.

It features interviews with vegan athletes, scientists and spends a lot of time with James Wilks – an elite Special Forces trainer and winner of The Game Changers The Ultimate Fighter. He is on a quest to discover the advantages of a plant-based diet in repairing the body after injury – obviously, the advantages of the diet are huge – but the fact that someone so closely connected to elite forces is endorsing veganism is huge news in itself and should banish a few ideas that vegans are weak and protein deficient.

World record-holding strongman Patrik Baboumian is also heavily featured – again this dispels any notion that a vegan diet leaves vegans weak and lacking in any nutrients. I like the fact that these athletes also points out the huge range of vegan foods which are now available.

There is a lot of scientific data in the film explaining why a vegan diet is healthier for both athletes and the general population. The information about vitamin B12 is particularly interesting – many state that it is only available from meat, however, it is added to animal feed and used to be available in the soil attached to vegetables – that is now killed by pesticides, therefore fortification or supplements are the best ways for humans to get B12 – vegan or not.

I was also particularly interested by the archaeological evidence challenging the notion that ancient man hunted to live. The argument that it was the marketing of meat that has formed many people’s beliefs in the need for it as part of a healthy diet, that it makes you stronger and more manly was fascinating to me. This section was well argued and it’s something I hadn’t thought of before. It has definitely given my another string to my bow when arguing veganism’s corner in debates.

The scenes of UFC fighter Conor McGregor mocking vegan Nate Diaz’s diet and then getting beaten by him made the already vegan members of the audience smile and nod that justice was done. McGregor was also seen relishing in his steak-based diet – however, Diaz was beaten in the rematch a couple of months later – this wasn’t mentioned or discussed in the film – a shame which could lead to some criticism.

Overall, it’s a very watchable film – the science is explained clearly and the narrative never gets bogged down in the complex scientific facts, but it doesn’t over-simplify them either – a balancing act which is hard to pull off successfully. The famous names and frank interviews are also a big draw for those interested in nutrition for athletes.

It’s well worth a watch and I definitely advise checking out the website for more details – here’s the trailer

 

A film more important than Earthlings

Land of Hope and Glory is described as the “UK Earthlings”.

It basically consists of undercover film shot in UK farms and slaughterhouses.

It’s harrowing, it’s hard to watch, it’s heartbreaking and shocking. It is also a film all vegans in the UK should watch.

Why?

Well, it’s free to view online – either from the website at the bottom of this article, or on Youtube.

The film is about 50 minutes long.

But mainly because the facts are laid bare. It’s a stark reminder of what is happening every single day of the year. Plus, everything you need to know to form a solid argument while debating with others is there.

These facts are also printed out on the website – as are links to where the footage came from.

So, if Earthlings already exists, why make this?

That too is answered on the website. The makers – Surge (surgeactivist.com – the group behind the Official Animal Rights March) said that people were saying “that doesn’t happen in our country” in response to Earthlings. This film proves it does.

I, personally, think that this film should now replace Earthlings in UK “experiences” as it’s more start, more relevant and will resonate with people on a deeper level in this country – this is their bacon, pork, eggs and milk.

Yes, eggs and milk. Make no mistake, this is a vegan film, not a vegetarian film – footage of the eggs and dairy industries are also laid bare.

It also dispels the myth that halal slaughter is somehow different to traditional methods of slaughter – stunning often does not work, and animals are still conscious when they have their throats slit.

The documentary is split into chapter by species – pigs, cows, sheep and birds. It does focus on farming and the use of animals for food – but there are other films available that tackle subjects such as animal experimentation and hunting.

There is a link on the website to a short film on fish.

Despite the fact this film was released earlier this year, it seems to be getting very little publicity among vegan groups on social media. That is the main reason I have decided to write this blog.

It is an important film. It’s modern, it shows what is happening on farms and in slaughterhouses here in the UK and it does not shy away from graphic, hard-hitting scenes.

In other words, it is vital ammunition in an activist’s arsenal.

It doesn’t go into the health benefits of a vegan diet (again that is discussed in other documentaries) and it would be nice to see a farmer try and defend what they do in a film such as this. I may think it’s indefensible, but I like to see a little balance just so the charge of “vegan propaganda” can be discounted.

I also think the fact the film lacks star appeal may put some people off – as does the fact that Earthlings is seen as THE animal rights film – but that doesn’t mean there isn’t room for other movies! There is certainly room for this – I cannot reiterate enough how relevant it is to the UK! It is notoriously difficult to obtain footage from inside slaughterhouses and farms, so this really needs to be seen by everyone:

By vegans to remind them of what goes on and to arm them with the facts.

By non-vegans to show them the suffering behind their diets.

See the film at https://www.landofhopeandglory.org/